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Dibrugarh University Arts Question Papers: PHILOSOPHY (Indian Philosophy - I) ' (November)-2014


2014
(November)
PHILOSOPHY
(General)
Course: 101
(Indian Philosophy - I)
Full Marks: 80
Pass Marks: 32
Time: 3 hours
The figures in the margin indicate full marks for the question


1. Find out the correct answer: 1x8=8
  1. Indian philosophy is divided into two/three divisions.
  2. Indian philosophy is/is not dogmatic.
  3. According to Carvaka philosophy perception/inference is the only source of knowledge.
  4. According to Nyaya/Vaisesika philosophy there are seven kings of Padarthas.
  5. ‘Ice looks cold’ – is the example of Jnana-Laksana/Samanya-Laksana Pratyaksa.
  6. According to Jaina/Buddha philosophy ‘Sarvam Anityam’.
  7. According to Carvaka philosophy, matter/soul is the ultimate reality of this world.
  8. Radhakrishnan/Rabindra Nath Tagore is the supporter of intuition.
2. Write short notes on (any four): 4x4=16
  1. Buddha philosophy’s concept of perception.
  2. Pratityasamutpadavada.
  3. Extraordinary perception of Nyaya philosophy.
  4. Carvaka ethics.
  5. ‘Soul’ of Vaisesika philosophy.
3. What do you mean by dogmatism? Can India philosophy be described as dogmatic philosophy? Give your opinions with proper arguments. 3+9=12
Or
Discuss the common characteristics of contemporary Indian philosophy. 12
4. Discuss thoroughly the views of Carvaka philosophy regarding the source of knowledge. 11
Or
Discuss in detail, the Jaina theory of Syadvada.
5. Explain the nature of perception as the source of knowledge, put forward by the Naiyayikas. Distinguish between Nirvikalpaka and Savikalpaka perceptions. 11
Or
What is Arthapatti? Can Arthapatti be accepted as independent source of knowledge? Discuss Mimamsa philosophy’s view in this regard. 11
6. Describe Carvaka’s theory of self. 11
Or
Why is ‘Abhava’ recognized as a Padartha in the Vaisesika system? How is it known? Describe different forms of Abhava.
7. Explain Jaina theory of Anekantavada. 11
Or
Discuss the No-soul theory of Buddha philosophy.



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