Communicative English Question Paper' 2019 | B.Com 1st Sem Hons | Dibrugarh University

 2019 (December)
ENGLISH - Paper: AECC-1
(Communicative English)
Full Marks: 40
Pass Marks: 16
Time: 2 hours

The figures in the margin indicate full marks for the questions

UNIT – I: (Communication: Theory and Types)

1. (a) Define communication. Discuss David Berlo’s SMCR model of communication.   2+3=5

Or

(b) What is formal communication? Discuss its advantages and disadvantages.   2+3=5

2. (a) Discuss the barriers to effective communication.     5

Or

(b) What is inter-personal communication? Discuss its features.         2+3=5

UNIT – II: (Speaking Skills)

3. (a) What is a monologue? Discuss the characteristics of a good monologue.     2+3=5

Or

(b) Write a dialogue between Nripen and Sujata – two college students when they met for the first time in the Youth Festival of Dibrugarh University. (Use fictitious name of colleges, if necessary.)      5

4. (a) Discuss the skills required for participating in a group discussion effectively.           5

Or

(b) How to prepare a good public speech? Elaborate.          5

UNIT – III

(Reading and Understanding)

5. (a) What is close reading? Discuss the steps involved in close reading.                2+3=5

Or

(b) Read the passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:

It seemed the little girl was born to sing. Her mother often recalled that when she was a baby, she would carry her piggyback to community singing events on festival days. As soon as the singers took up a tune and gradually when their collective voices began to swell in volume and harmony, her daughter would twist herself this way and that and start singing her own version of the song, mostly consisting of loud shrieks and screams. Though amusing at first, her daughter’s antics irritated the spectators and singers as well, and often, she had to withdraw from the gathering in embarrassment. What the mother considered unreasonable behaviour in a child barely a year old, was actually the first indication of the singing genius that she had given birth to.

When Apenyo, as the little girl was called, could walk and talk a little, her mother would take her to Church on Sundays because she could not be left alone at home. On other days she was left in the care of her grandmother when the mother went to the fields; but on this day there was no one to take care of her as everyone went to Church. When the congregation sang together Apenyo would also join, though her little screams were not quite audible because of the group singing. But whenever there was a special number, trouble would begin; Apenyo would try to sing along, much to the embarrassment of the mother. After two or three such mortifying Sunday outings, the mother stopped going to Church altogether until Apenyo became older and learnt how to behave.

Question:

1)         What did Apenyo’s mother often recall?                     1

2)         Why did Apenyo’s mother take her to Church on Sundays?     1

3)         Why did she stop going to the Church?                                                        2

4)         Find a word in the passage which means ‘foolish, outrageous or amusing behaviour’.   1

6. Answer any one of the following question:                     5

a)         What is paraphrasing? How is it different from summarizing?            2+3=5

b)         Write a summary of the following passage:                                                5

Having been elected to the Executive Committee of the Vegetarian Society, and made it a point to attend every one of its meetings, but I always felt tongue-tied. It often happened that just when I had mustered up courage to speak, a fresh subject would be started. This went on for a long time throughout my stay in England. Even when I paid a social call, the presence of half a dozen or more people would make me dumb.

My last effort to make a public speech in England was on the eve of my departure for home. But this time too I only succeeded in making myself ridiculous. I invited my vegetarian friends to dinner in the Holborn Restaurant. I arranged with the manager of the Holborn Restaurant to provide a strictly vegetarian meal. The vegetarians hailed the new experiment with delight. In the West, dinners are celebrated with great music and speeches. Speeches, therefore, there had to be. When my turn for speaking came, I stood up to make a speech. But I could not proceed beyond the first sentence. My memory entirely failed me and in attempting a humorous speech I made myself ridiculous. “I thank you, gentlemen, for having kindly responded to my invitation,” I said abruptly, and sat down.

It was only in South Africa that I got over this shyness, though I never completely overcame it. I hesitated whenever I had to face strange audiences. My hesitancy in speech, which was once an annoyance, is now a pleasure. Its greatest benefit has been that it has taught me the economy of words.

c)          What do you understand by equivalence in translation?                      5

Or

What are the difficulties in translating from source language to target language?

UNIT – IV: (Writing Skills)

7. (a) What is documenting? What are the steps involved in documenting?      2+3=5

Or

(b) Prepare a report on the observation of Independence Day at your college this year. (Use ABC as the name of your college.)               5

8. (a) Make notes from the following passage using headings, sub-headings and recognizable abbreviations:      5

The quest for freedom cannot be suppressed. It arises from a recognition of the inestimable dignity and value of a person, and it cannot fail to be accompanied by personal commitment. Revolutions are made possible by the commitment of brave men and women inspired by a different, and ultimately more profound and powerful , vision: the vision of man as a creature of intelligence and free will, immersed in a mystery which transcends his own being and endows him with the ability to reflect, choose, and gain wisdom and virtue.

Freedom is the measure of man’s dignity and greatness. Living the freedom sought by individuals is a great challenge to man’s spiritual growth and to the moral vitality of nations. The basic question we must all face today is the responsible use of freedom.

Freedom is not simply the absence of tyranny or oppression. Nor is freedom a license to do whatever we like. Freedom has an inner logic which distinguishes it and ennobles it: freedom is ordered to the truth, and is fulfilled in man’s quest for truth and in man’s living the truth. Detached from the truth about the human person, freedom deteriorates into license in the lives of individuals, and, in political life, it becomes the caprice of the most powerful and the arrogance of power.

Far from being a limitation upon freedom or a threat to it, reference to the truth about the human person, truth universally knowable through the moral law written on the hearts of all is, in fact, the guarantor of freedom’s future.

Now it is time for a new hops, which calls us to expel the paralyzing burden of cynicism from human life. Inspired by the example of all those who have taken the risk of freedom can we not recommit ourselves also to taking the risk of peace?

It is one of the great paradoxes of our time that man, who began this century with a self-confident assertion of his coming of age and autonomy, approaches the end of the twentieth century fearful of himself and fearful for the future.

Or

(b) A portion of the embankment of a river in your locality was damaged in the recent flood. Draft a letter to the Deputy Commissioner of your district describing the difficulties faced by the people of the area and requesting him / her to take steps for restoration of the damaged embankment. (Write a fictitious name of a district and do not mention the name of your college or your name anywhere in the letter.)

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